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NOT A TYPICAL SUDAN PHOTO TOUR


This Sudan photo tour is closer in concept to a photography expedition than our regular photography trip to a remote area. It is therefore not so much about visiting a variety of destinations as it is to understand and immortalize photographically a culture which is entirely different from the one we live in. The extraordinary plasticity of the images is what makes this Sudan photo tour so powerful and extraordinary.

In an authentic experience between photography and personal ties, we will be staying next to their camps. Sudan is one of the world's youngest countries, home to the Mundari, Dinka, Boya, and Toposa ethnic groups and tribes, who are among the world's most authentic and untouched ethnic groups and tribes.


In the camps, the photographic joy of capturing mythical photographs of dust lifted by the cattle, sunrise smoke, and, almost, animal noise, develops into an almost magical atmosphere.

While there is a massive cultural gap between us and the tribes we are visiting, they are friendly and welcoming. Curiosity draws the locals, who want to learn everything they can about the visitors.

This isn't your typical Sudan photo tour (if such a thing exists). The haze of fire smoke and the dust of the plains provide a one-of-a-kind photographic experience, with our main goal being to bring home incredible photographs that will be etched in our minds forever.

 

Sudan Photo Tour image with cattle

 

Nearly a Private Photography Trip

It's an incredible photographic opportunity to be a part of this Sudan photographic experience. This is a Photography Expedition where we blend photography as well as the everyday experience of being next to an ancestral culture.

The group is small and we are all passionate travelers and photographers. Mundari breeders, who are mainly herders and breeders, have a special bond with their animals.

It's difficult to put into words how wonderful it is to spend time in a Mundari cattle camp. Between sunrise and sunset sessions with these amazing people, we will learn about the daily life of the camp and fell asleep at night listening to the cowbells and the Mundari people singing. It's a magical feeling to be out there.

Cattle are a symbol of their faith as well as their whole reason for being. The Mundaris' history, present, and future are all intertwined with their livestock to the point that men and cows are almost indistinguishable. They have a mutually beneficial friendship. The beasts are more than just a food source (milk, even blood, but not meat), a source of wealth, or a status symbol.